Judge DENIES Amber Heard’s motion to have the verdict of her trial against Johnny Depp thrown out

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Judge DENIES Amber Heard’s motion to have the verdict of her trial against Johnny Depp thrown out: Amber Heard’s plea to have the result of her blockbuster defamation trial against her ex-husband Johnny Depp thrown out and the case retried was denied in its entirety by the judge who presided over the case.

The attorneys who represent Heard, who is 36 years old, submitted a motion at the beginning of this month arguing that the verdict that she had defamed Depp, who is 59 years old, was not supported by evidence.

They also claimed that a juror had not been subjected to the appropriate screening process and questioned whether or not it was appropriate for that juror to even be seated on the jury.

According to documentation from the court that was obtained by DailyMail.com, Judge Penny Azcarate turned down all of Heard’s post-trial petitions on Wednesday.

Heard’s legal team argued in a 43-page memorandum that the verdict, as well as the $10 million in damages she now owes Depp, should be overturned on the grounds that during the trial, Depp ‘proceeded solely on defamation by implication theory, abandoning any claims that Ms. Heard’s statements were actually false.’ In other words, during the trial, Depp did not attempt to prove that Heard’s statements

Ben Chew, the main attorney for Depp, gave a statement in response to the motion, which was published by Courthouse News. In the statement, he said, “What we expected, just longer, no more meaningful.”

Heard has stated that she is unable to pay the number of damages she owes to Depp, which is $10.35 million.

Even though she has indicated in the past that she is interested in appealing the verdict, in order for her to do so, she would be required to post a bond in the amount of the whole damages. It is highly likely that this most recent motion was an attempt to get around those limitations in order to pursue a fresh verdict in any way possible.

The move raised questions about the legitimacy of the jury selection procedure by drawing attention to a member of the jury, designated as Juror 15, whose birth year was recorded in the court records as 1945.

In the submission, it was asserted that Juror 15 “was obviously born after the year 1945.” According to evidence that is readily available to the public, they most likely came into the world in the year 1970.

“This discrepancy begs the question as to whether or not Juror 15 truly got a summons for jury duty and was properly vetted by the court to serve on the jury,” stated the court.

According to what is written in the complaint, “it appears his identification could not have been validated.”

Additionally, Heard contended that the damages that were awarded to Depp were excessive since the jurors decided to award them for factors that were unrelated to the dispute that he was involved in.

Although Depp “represented to the court that he would limit his damages to the period Dec. 18, 2018, through November 2, 2020,” which is the time period between when Heard’s op-ed about Depp’s alleged abuse was published in the Washington Post and when a UK court ruled that he had abused Heard, the motion argues that Depp did not attempt in any way to focus the scope of his alleged damages within that two-year time frame. Instead, the motion states that Depp did.

“Mr. Depp did not make any effort of this kind at any time during the trial to minimize the number of damages he sought.” Instead, Mr. Depp continued to urge the jury to restore his reputation and legacy to his children even throughout the Closings as a result of Ms. Heard charging Mr. Depp with domestic violence in May of 2016.

Judge Penney Azcarate has made it abundantly clear that she does not want the case to continue forward in its current state. During the most recent hearing related to the case on June 24, in which the judge finalized the verdict in the court’s records, she rejected requests from Heard’s team for additional hearings. During this hearing, the judge also finalized the verdict in the court’s records.

On the day in question, Judge Azcarate informed the group representing Heard that they might make a request to the court for permission to appeal the decision if they so desired.

In the judgment that was handed out in June, it was determined that both celebrities had defamed each other; nevertheless, the odds were significantly in Depp’s favor.

Heard found in his favor and granted him damages totaling $10.35 million, while Depp found in her favor and awarded her only $2 million in damages. After everything was said and done, Heard was found to owe Depp a staggering $8.35 million.

Later on, Heard confirmed through her attorney that she was unable to pay the millions of dollars in damages, and a day after the verdict, her representation announced that they would appeal it.

Since then, however, her stance on the issue has shifted, and there have been rumors circulating that she intends to produce a book in which she reveals everything in order to gain money to compensate for the damages.

A person who is close to Heard has been quoted as saying that she is “broke” and is not “in a position to refuse away money.”

After a string of unfortunate events, it was reported that she “considers her career in Hollywood to be done” and that she “had nothing to lose.”

During an interview that took place in June on Good Morning America, Chew made the remark that the singer might be prepared to forego the millions of dollars in damages that were owing to him if it was agreed upon by Heard that she would not continue with an appeal.

However, Heard’s attorneys missed out on that opportunity during the hearing on June 24, when they declined to reach such an arrangement and Azcarate formalized the conviction. As a result, the only option left for Heard at this point is to file an appeal.

However, in order for that to happen, Heard would have to come up with the money to post a bond for the full sum of the $10.35 million while the appeal is still pending. This is standard procedure.