Executive admits that Pfizer didn’t know if the Covid vaccine stopped transmission before it was used.

41

Executive admits that Pfizer didn’t know if the Covid vaccine stopped transmission before it was used. A top executive at Pfizer has said that the company didn’t know if its Covid vaccine stopped the spread of the virus when it started giving the shots all over the world.

Rob Roos, a Dutch MEP, asked Janine Small this question Monday when she was testifying in front of the European Union Parliament. Small is the president of Pfizer’s internationally developed markets.

“Was the Pfizer Covid vaccine tested to see if it stopped the virus from spreading before it went on sale?” Mr. Roos asked.

“If not, please explain it. If so, are you willing to give this committee the information? I really want a yes or no answer, and I’m looking forward to it.”

Ms. Small answered that the company had to “move at the speed of science.” She was there in place of Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla, who had been asked to testify but backed out of the hearing earlier this month.

“Regarding the question, um, did we know about stopping the immunization before it hit the market? She said, “No, heh.”

“Uh, these, you know, we had to move at the speed of science to really understand what was going on in the market, so we had to do everything at risk. Even though Dr. Bourla isn’t here, I think he would turn around and ask you, “If not us, then who?”

Ms. Small said that Dr. Bourla “actually felt the importance of what was going on in the world, and as a result, we actually spent $US2 billion of Pfizer’s own money, at risk, to be able to research, develop, and manufacture at risk, to make sure that we could help with the pandemic.”

Mr. Roos posted a short clip of Ms. Small’s answer to his tweet and called it “scandalous.”

“The myth that “you do it for others” made millions of people around the world feel like they had to get vaccinated,” he said in the video, which has been watched more than five million times.

“It turned out that this was a cheap lie. This should be out in the open.”

Mr. Roos said that the admission took away the whole reason for vaccine mandates and passports, which “led to massive institutional discrimination as people lost access to important parts of society.”

“I find this shocking and maybe even wrong,” he said.

At the beginning of the global rollout, drug companies and public health officials said that the shots would stop the virus from spreading. In April 2021, Dr. Bourla said that early trial data showed that his vaccine was “100% effective against severe Covid-19.”

At first, there were only a few so-called “breakthrough” infections, but by the end of 2021, it was clear that even people who had been vaccinated were still getting sick and spreading the virus.

Health officials in places like Australia now say that the vaccines don’t stop the disease from spreading completely, but they do make it less severe, which makes hospitals less busy.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the White House’s chief medical adviser, said earlier this year that the Covid vaccines “don’t protect too well against infections, but they do protect quite well against severe diseases that can lead to hospitalization and death.”

In January, Dr. Bourla said that two doses of the vaccine didn’t protect against the Omicron variant at all or only “very little.”

Ms. Small told the EU Parliament about a recent paper from Imperial College London that said Covid vaccines might have stopped almost 20 million deaths in their first year.

Imperial College has been criticized in the past for its disastrously wrong Covid modeling, which caused the UK to go into lockdown.

“I think that’s why it made me feel so good when a recent paper from the Imperial College said that vaccines saved four million lives in the first year they were used,” Ms. Small said.

“So, from that point of view, I think that we were there when the world needed us to make sure that we could help people around the world with vaccinations and now oral treatment.”

She also said that she couldn’t imagine what the world would be like right now if companies like hers hadn’t taken risks and done large-scale clinical research and development to make sure there was a vaccine that could be given to everyone.

“I really do understand how you feel,” she said.

“But I also hope that at some point, somewhere, you realize what pharmaceutical companies have done to make vaccines available so quickly and in such large numbers.”

A top executive at Pfizer has said that the company didn’t know if its Covid vaccine stopped the spread of the virus when it started giving the shots all over the world.

Rob Roos, a Dutch MEP, asked Janine Small this question Monday when she was testifying in front of the European Union Parliament. Small is the president of Pfizer’s internationally developed markets.

“Was the Pfizer Covid vaccine tested to see if it stopped the virus from spreading before it went on sale?” Mr. Roos asked.

“If not, please explain it. If so, are you willing to give this committee the information? I really want a yes or no answer, and I’m looking forward to it.”

Ms. Small answered that the company had to “move at the speed of science.” She was there in place of Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla, who had been asked to testify but backed out of the hearing earlier this month.

“Regarding the question, um, did we know about stopping the immunization before it hit the market? She said, “No, heh.”

“Uh, these, you know, we had to move at the speed of science to really understand what was going on in the market, so we had to do everything at risk. Even though Dr. Bourla isn’t here, I think he would turn around and ask you, “If not us, then who?”

Ms. Small said that Dr. Bourla “actually felt the importance of what was going on in the world, and as a result, we actually spent $US2 billion of Pfizer’s own money, at risk, to be able to research, develop, and manufacture at risk, to make sure that we could help with the pandemic.

Mr. Roos posted a short clip of Ms. Small’s answer to his tweet and called it “scandalous.”

“The myth that “you do it for others” made millions of people around the world feel like they had to get vaccinated,” he said in the video, which has been watched more than five million times.

“It turned out that this was a cheap lie. This should be out in the open.”

Want to get your news online? Flash lets you watch 25 or more news channels at once. Are you new to Flash? Try out a free month. until October 31, 2022,>

Mr. Roos said that the admission took away the whole reason for vaccine mandates and passports, which “led to massive institutional discrimination as people lost access to important parts of society.”

“I find this shocking and maybe even wrong,” he said.

At the beginning of the global rollout, drug companies and public health officials said that the shots would stop the virus from spreading. In April 2021, Dr. Bourla said that early trial data showed that his vaccine was “100% effective against severe Covid-19.”

At first, there were only a few so-called “breakthrough” infections, but by the end of 2021, it was clear that even people who had been vaccinated were still getting sick and spreading the virus.

Health officials in places like Australia now say that the vaccines don’t stop the disease from spreading completely, but they do make it less severe, which makes hospitals less busy.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the White House’s chief medical adviser, said earlier this year that the Covid vaccines “don’t protect too well against infections, but they do protect quite well against severe diseases that can lead to hospitalization and death.”

In January, Dr. Bourla said that two doses of the vaccine didn’t protect against the Omicron variant at all or only “very little.”

Ms. Small told the EU Parliament about a recent paper from Imperial College London that said Covid vaccines might have stopped almost 20 million deaths in their first year.

Imperial College has been criticized in the past for its disastrously wrong Covid modeling, which caused the UK to go into lockdown.

“I think that’s why it made me feel so good when a recent paper from the Imperial College said that vaccines saved four million lives in the first year they were used,” Ms. Small said.

“So, from that point of view, I think that we were there when the world needed us to make sure that we could help people around the world with vaccinations and now oral treatment.”

She also said that she couldn’t imagine what the world would be like right now if companies like hers hadn’t taken risks and done large-scale clinical research and development to make sure there was a vaccine that could be given to everyone.

“I really do understand how you feel,” she said.

“But I also hope that at some point, somewhere, you realise what pharmaceutical companies have done to make vaccines available so quickly and in such large numbers.”

Demonstrators in front of the New Zealand parliament. Photo: Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images

Demonstrators in front of the New Zealand parliament. Photo: Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images

The Guardian said that Pfizer’s Covid vaccine was one of the most profitable products ever, with sales of nearly $US37 billion last year. By 2021, total sales will have doubled to $US81.3 billion, making it one of the most profitable products ever.